LATEST BLOG ENTRY

Embed Innovation Systematically Part 3, Reflection Questions – Eric’s Story

August 27, 2014

Ziglar Success I’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. Congratulations! We have arrived at the final step in innovative leadership development. In this post, we will cover the second set of reflection questions to strengthen your understanding of embedding innovation systematically into your lifestyle. My answers are in italics for you to use as a reference to further understand the questions.

Embed change

Congratulations! This has been the final post in the innovative leadership development series for college students! Remember, innovative leadership and personal development are lifestyles. Once you have developed one skill/behavior to an ideal capacity, you must continue to focus on more areas to develop in order to strengthen your arsenal of skills as a person. Feel free to revisit my posts, or purchase the Innovative Leadership Workbook for College Students coming out in late 2014. Good luck!

Photo credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

Implementing and Measuring Big Data/Embed Transformation

August 24, 2014

Big Data Art Museum ImageIn this blog series, James Brenza has been talking about implementing big data and analytics programs using a composite case study to illustrate the process. Each week James focuses on one of the seven steps giving specific examples to help illustrate how the tools can be used in a very practical manner. This is the last of the series that corresponds with the seven stage implementation model (shown below). More information on that robust model is available in the seven stage implementation model. More information on that robust model is available in the Innovative Leaders Workbook for Implementing Analytics Programs by Maureen Metcalf and James Brenza (scheduled for release in September 2014).

Leading Organizational Transformation

Embed into operations: As an analytic initiative produces transformational results, it’s the leader’s responsibility to ensure the changes are operationalized. If the sponsors, stakeholders, and extended team have been effectively engaged throughout the initiative, this could be a straightforward effort. By ensuring the extended team of system and process owners have received regular updates, they should be prepared to embrace the new methods. Ideally, they’ve been sufficiently involved to prototype and test the new processes. While existing systems may require revisions, small, incremental deliveries may help reduce the impact of the updates.

Celebrate success: As the new models are implemented, success should be celebrated with the entire team. It’s important for the leader to recognize and reward the entire team even if the change is relatively small.  The recognition should commend the use of enterprise data, the effort to validate and integrate the data, the work to build new models, and the energy required to operationalize them. Recognition should reference the business outcome and how it will be measured. It’s also a perfect time to identify which process steps or systems will be retired as a result of the new methods. If the leader includes that in the same message, it sends a much stronger signal about how firmly the enterprise espouses the new approach.

The measure of the outcome and process control cannot be taken lightly. It’s critical that the new methods are delivering the intended results. While analytic models are robust, it’s important to recognize they should be monitored and refined. The leader should guarantee that an ongoing process to monitor the results has been institutionalized. That process should include a feedback loop for ongoing model refinement and initiation of future initiatives.

Enable on-going visibility: The outcome measures initially identified and refined throughout the initiative should be documented in an executive dashboard and reviewed frequently. This will help reinforce the success and benefits of the initiative. The owner of the outcome should be encouraged to reference those measures in their regularly scheduled executive updates. This affirms they own the outcome as well as acknowledge the benefits of the initiative.

As the team celebrates the success of their outcome, they should also acknowledge their contribution to the process. This will reinforce the adoption of data and model-driven process improvements. When the models require maintenance, we recommend creating a list that will act as a reference for which team members should be re-engaged. It’s also important to recognize that model maintenance is a requirement and an expectation.  Regular or intermittent maintenance is a reality and should not be viewed as a deficiency of the team’s effort.

How is leading a big data/analytics initiative different than other projects? So let’s take a moment to reflect on what’s unique about data and analytic initiatives.

  • The leader should be certain the celebration of the implementation is not simply for the analytic effort. They need to ensure it is associated with the business outcome realized.
  • It should always be referenced by the measures that will be impacted by the outcome.
  • The leader needs to make sure the organization understands that the models will evolve as the journey continues.
  • Most significantly, the leader needs to tout that the victory is owned by the sponsors and stakeholders. Allowing them to share the celebration, helps the leader change the culture to be open to data and model driven transformations in the future.

Throughout this series, we’ve looked at the unique aspects of analytic initiatives and transformations. If treated like a system deployment or upgrade, the leader will encounter significant struggles to maintain engagement and attain the outcome. By putting strong emphasis on executive sponsorship, robust stakeholder management, broad team engagement, deep reviews of capabilities and skills, thorough planning that embraces flexibility, thorough communication planning, transparent progress reporting and strong execution, the leader can guide the organization to tangible results. By ensuring that results are measured through a financial or customer-centric lens, they’ll provide a lasting impact to their organization. Ultimately, the leader’s success will help the organization become more comfortable with analytic driven initiatives that will help guide the organization for decades.

If you are interested in reading more by James, you may want to read:  Evaluating Big Data Projects – Success and Failure Using an Integral Lens, Integral Leadership Review August – November 2013. You can also listen to the NPR interview that accompanies this paper including a dialogue between James Brenza, Maureen Metcalf, and the host Doug Dangler.

We also invite you to join the LinkedIn group Innovative Leadership for Analytics Programs on LinkedIn curated by James.

To become a more innovative leader, please consider our online leader development program. For additional tools, we recommend taking leadership assessments, using the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook and Innovative Leaders Guide to Transforming Organizations, and adding coaching to our online innovative leadership program. We also offer several workshops to help you build these skills.

If you are interested in receiving James’ seven part blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo credit: David J. Staley, Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Embed Innovation Systematically Reflection Questions Part 2 — Eric’s Story

August 22, 2014

DaVinci self masteryI’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. Congratulations! We have arrived at the final step in innovative leadership development. In this post, we will cover reflection questions part 1 to strengthen your understanding of embedding innovation systematically into your lifestyle. My answers are in italics for you to use as a reference to further understand the questions.

Eric's embed change reflection questions

There will only be one more post in the innovative leadership development series for college students! In the next post we will review the second half of the reflection questions.

To become a more innovative leader, please consider our online leader development program. For additional tools, we recommend taking leadership assessments, using the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook and Innovative Leaders Guide to Transforming Organizations, and adding coaching to our online innovative leadership program. We also offer several workshops to help you build these skills.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

Embed Innovation Systematically – Eric’s Story

August 20, 2014

Michael Jordan TryI’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. Congratulations! We have arrived at the final step in innovative leadership development. In this post, we will complete the beginning of a Personal Transformation Log. With this, we will know how to track our actual behaviors toward our goals, measure progress, and compare them to expected behaviors and progress. As always, my responses are in italics, which you can use to strengthen your understanding of the question. The next part of this post will give you a real-world application suggestions.

Eric Transformation Actiity Log

Real World Application: Expect the Unexpected & Fail Fast

While it’s important to focus on what’s in front of you in the present, it’s also important to consider the future. As you make progress on your current goals, and you’re in a good rhythm, take a few moments occasionally to consider what goals you could set in the future. Consider upcoming events, such as job hunting or graduate school programs. What kind of skills and behaviors would you like to develop by then? Another important thing is to take unpredictable events into account.

One thing that is guaranteed is that some completely unexpected and uncontrollable events will happen in your life, and they could greatly impact your short- and long-term goals. Due to this, it may be worth considering strengthening your resilience and problem-solving skills/behaviors when setting goals in the future.

Remember, failure is natural and no one is perfect. View mistakes and failure as an opportunity to learn. After all, the only true failure is failure to try.  Remember to think like a scientist, and use experiments, or constant trial-and-error. We like to use the term “fail fast”, meaning the faster you figure out what does not work, the faster you can figure out what does work.

In the next post, we will answer reflection questions to strengthen your understanding of embedding innovation systematically.  

To become a more innovative leader, please consider our online leader development program. For additional tools, we recommend taking leadership assessments, using the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook and Innovative Leaders Guide to Transforming Organizations, and adding coaching to our online innovative leadership program. We also offer several workshops to help you build these skills.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

Implementing and Measuring Big Data/Analytics Programs

August 17, 2014

Big Data WordscapeIn this blog series, James Brenza has been talking about implementing big data and analytics programs using a composite case study to illustrate the process. Each week James focuses on one of the seven steps giving specific examples to help illustrate how the tools can be used in a very practical manner. This is the sixth in the series that corresponds with the seven stage implementation model. More information on that robust model is available in the Innovative Leaders Workbook for Implementing Analytics Programs by Maureen Metcalf and James Brenza (scheduled for release in September 2014).

Leading Organizational Transformation

Follow a methodology: The execution phase of an analytics initiative has some similarities to other efforts, but is also very unique. The similarity is the extensive use of systems and processes; the use of databases and servers is quite common. However, some of the types of databases or servers will be unique to analytic efforts. Due to the volume of data or use of statistical analysis, new infrastructure may be required. It is critical that the infrastructure is available and validated prior to attempting any model development. It is possible and reasonable to deploy the infrastructure while the teams assess data and build models, but concurrent development of all levels of the solution multiplies risk. Establishing core infrastructure design and the data for initial analysis contains the risk as small models are built incrementally. Additionally, the data discovery methods may be unique to many team members. The team can significantly reduce barriers by embracing an industry standard (e.g., CRISP-DM), leveraging published documents on its use and demonstrating how they align with it.

For the preparation of data for analysis, the leader should be very clear on the progress of establishing, exploring, understanding, cleansing and integrating the data. This is especially critical if new data sources are being used or if it’s the first time a well-established data source has been used for this type of initiative. Even though data may be used for business transactions, the team can’t assume the data is sufficiently standardized for analysis. The leader must ensure this clarity through collaboration with business analysts and data scientists to develop a graphical depiction of each data source going through validation and normalization processes.

Let the data guide you: Since the team should be following an iterative execution methodology, they must be prepared to demonstrate flexibility and adaptability as the results of the data analysis guide their tasks. As hypotheses are constructed, the team should embrace the possibility of proving themselves wrong. If the team focuses on data that will only prove and support their hypotheses, they are creating a potential failure. Bad models don’t age well—so the team has to attempt to break their own assumptions. They’ll also need to hold back portions of the data for model validation and training. This standard process will allow them to increase confidence in the models.

Another example of this could be when two (or more) data sources that are being mined have historically supported different operational purposes.  At first glance, data elements may appear to align across the systems. As the analysis evolves, data issues arise in which apparent logical matches are broken. With deeper analysis, the team may discover that similarly-named attributes serve unique purposes. In isolation and context, each source is 100 percent accurate. By being open to opportunities, the team may simplify the challenges being solved, or identify additional solutions based on a single model.

Embrace continuous change: At present, the pace of technology and technique innovation is faster in analytics than in nearly any other technology field.  The industry is continuously adding new capabilities that will greatly simplify solutions. Additionally, many business intelligence and visual tool vendors have enabled community development for new features faster than any single vendor can invent them. While building an initial infrastructure is required, it is critical to consider that it must have the capability to evolve quickly. Embracing this continuous state of evolution is key to maintaining team productivity as well as user satisfaction.

Keep communications flowing: Throughout the execution, the leader should constantly refine the plan and communications to transparently discuss the progress of the iterations and the stride toward the final outcome. This can be accomplished by documenting planned versus actual progress for each sprint. By ensuring each sprint completes some demonstrable progress, the leader will be equipped to maintain sponsor confidence. As each progress demonstration is completed, the leader should review the stakeholder management plan to ensure that sponsors and stakeholders are maintaining or increasing their engagement. If support is waning, the stakeholder management plan must be revisited to reactivate support.

As the models evolve, the team can assess the system and process changes necessary to implement them. At the same time, they should review the measures that will ensure use of the models. An ideal mechanism to support that is to simultaneously define and communicate the rewards associated with the model utilization. Communicating the rewards will help reinforce the new operational methods and behaviors as well as support the retirement of the outdated processes.

Focus on team health: Due to the iterative nature of the process and continuous data discovery, the team will go through many cycles of elation and challenges. The leader should focus on team resiliency to ensure team members remain committed and cohesive. It’s important to recognize that challenges in the data or models are not a reflection of the team’s ability, rather they are an artifact of reality. By focusing on celebrating successes and alleviating team stress, the leader can help the team maintain its momentum. To help reinforce that consistency, the leader should regularly engage the sponsors to provide additional support to preserve and cultivate team morale.

How is leading a big data/analytics initiative different than other projects? So let’s take a moment to sum up what’s unique about data and analytic initiatives.

  • The constant discovery of data and model strength requires vigilant and transparent updates to the sponsors. They should receive regular status reports that reinforce the notion that the initiative is not a traditional system implementation, but a process of discovery.
  • The solution infrastructure and tool use may evolve throughout solution development.
  • Referring to the initiative as a journey is an appropriate phrase.
  • The leader should be prepared to provide frequent updates on data discovery and model evolution which may include frequent bad news (which if it disproves outdated assumptions is actually good news).
  • The constant flexibility to link model effectiveness to a business outcome is very unique to these initiatives.

As the initiative progresses, the team must be prepared to incrementally implement improvements as they become available. In the next section, we’ll discuss techniques to embed the transformation.

If you are interested in reading more by James, you may want to read:  Evaluating Big Data Projects – Success and Failure Using an Integral Lens, Integral Leadership Review August – November 2013. You can also listen to the NPR interview that accompanies this paper including a dialogue between James Brenza, Maureen Metcalf, and the host Doug Dangler.

We also invite you to join the LinkedIn group Innovative Leadership for Analytics Programs on LinkedIn curated by James.

To become a more innovative leader, please consider our online leader development program. For additional tools, we recommend taking leadership assessments, using the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook and Innovative Leaders Guide to Transforming Organizations, and adding coaching to our online innovative leadership program. We also offer several workshops to help you build these skills.

If you are interested in receiving James’ seven part blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com Marlus B.

Take Action to Develop as a Leader, Reflection Questions Part 2 – Eric’s Story

August 15, 2014

I’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In this post I will answer the second set of reflection questions involved with prepared to take action. As always, feel free to refer to my personal answers in italics to get a better sense of what we’re asking. I am answering these reflection questions to clarify my thoughts about my plan to overcome barriers and leverage enablers from my prior post.

Eric Taking Action Reflection questions

This marks the end of the Take Action part of the innovative leadership development process. In the next post, we will learn how to embed innovation systematically and maintain the mindset of an innovative leader throughout your life.

To become a more innovative leader, please consider our online leader development program. For additional tools, we recommend taking leadership assessments, using the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook and Innovative Leaders Guide to Transforming Organizations, and adding coaching to our online innovative leadership program. We also offer several workshops to help you build these skills.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Take Action to Develop as a Leader, Reflection Questions – Eric’s Story

August 13, 2014

Overcoming ObstaclesI’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In this post we will answer reflection questions so that we are thoroughly prepared to take action. As always, feel free to refer to my personal answers in italics to get a better sense of what we’re asking. I am answering these reflection questions to clarify my thoughts about my plan to overcome barriers and leverage enablers from my prior post.

Eric Take Action Reflection Questions

This post contained the first half of the reflection questions for taking action. In the next post I will complete the reflection questions.

To become a more innovative leader, please consider our online leader development program. For additional tools, we recommend taking leadership assessments, using the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook and Innovative Leaders Guide to Transforming Organizations, and adding coaching to our online innovative leadership program. We also offer several workshops to help you build these skills.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

photo credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

 

 

Implementing Big Data Programs/Analytics – Communicate

August 10, 2014

Analytics at WorkIn this blog series, James Brenza has been talking about implementing big data and analytics programs using a composite case study to illustrate the process. Each week James focuses on one of the seven steps giving specific examples to help illustrate how the tools can be used in a very practical manner. This is the fifth in the series that corresponds with the seven stage implementation model (shown below). More information on that robust model is available in the Innovative Leaders Workbook for Implementing Analytics Programs by Maureen Metcalf and James Brenza (scheduled for release in September 2014).

Build the communication plan: After the leader has set the direction, established the team, assessed the challenges they’ll encounter, and built a plan for success, a thorough communication plan is the next logical step. For analytic initiatives, a one-size-fits-all communication plan will not work. The communication plan must adapt to the nature of the initiative and the organization’s ability to implement the change.

While assessing the organization earlier in the process, the team should have a good understanding of the organization’s support for the change. If this is their first analytics initiative, additional communications will be necessary to build awareness of the approach and tools. For organizations that have leveraged data and analytics previously, the team still needs to provide ongoing communications to build understanding of the current effort and maintain awareness of the progress. As the team prepares for implementation, the need for adoption and operationalization will require significant communications. The key point to recognize is how the purpose of the communications will change throughout the initiative.

While the content of the communications will vary throughout the initiative, the team should try to maintain 4 consistent elements of their communication plan: frequency, depth, understanding, and follow-through.

  1. The frequency of the communications must be maintained to preserve awareness, gain buy-in, and build toward action. The sponsors and stakeholders will become conditioned to expect a regular update. This will automatically increase their awareness and moves them toward action.
  2. The depth of the communications should be consistent to ensure their engagement, but not so deep that it intimidates or triggers boredom. If a communication triggers a few requests for details, the leader should consider it a success that sponsors are reaching for a deeper understanding. If all communication recipients have questions, the communication approach will need to be revised to provide more appropriate or clear content.
  3. While it isn’t necessary that the extended team have a full technical understanding of the initiative, they need to appreciate the impact on the outcome.
  4. The last critical element of the communications is follow-through. Maintaining sponsor and stakeholder support throughout the initiative requires follow-through on all commitments for additional information or interim deliverables.

Define and reinforce a key theme: The initial communication plan must address all phases of the initiative. The purpose of the communications will vary, but the leader should establish a recurring theme. By understanding the progress of the initiative and desired outcome of the communication, the team can select the key points in each communication task and choose the most appropriate media for delivering that message. While some regularity to the communication media is ideal (e.g., monthly newsletter or weekly progress report using a consistent template), mixing the media for other communications increases interest. As the initiative progresses, a short video from stakeholders or the executive sponsor with their personal observations is a perfect way to maintain organization commitment. Videos are an extremely useful media to provide a contextual demonstration of progress without being excessively technical.

Stick with the plan: The most important part of the communication plan is to follow it. Many leaders and teams will divert their attention to “doing” the initiative and shelve the communication plan. Analytic initiatives can be a mystery to many sponsors and extended team members. Without a regular reminder of the initiative and progress update, the team is at risk of losing focus and support. So even if some of the messages aren’t great news (e.g., the initial mining of data didn’t provide the full insights anticipated), it’s more critical to maintain the awareness and transparency than compromise the communication plan in favor of quiet progress.

How is leading a big data/analytics initiative different than other projects? So let’s take a moment to focus on what’s unique about data and analytic initiatives.

  • Given the sometimes mysterious nature of analytic initiatives, it’s extremely important to plan communications and continue to execute that plan throughout the initiative.
  • That communication plan must uniquely provide continuous support for the vision while maintaining flexibility as the discovery process progresses. Since an iterative approach is being used, extended team members may not be familiar with that nuance.
  • The team should be prepared to provide regular demonstrations of progress in non-technical terms. The strength of the analytic models can be discussed, but only in terms of a business outcome.
  • Most importantly, the communication plan must continually reinforce that an analytics initiative is a journey and not a direct system implementation.

We’ve discussed many steps and teams to establish an environment for success.  In the next section we’ll discuss techniques for maintaining that success during execution.

If you are interested in reading more by James, you may want to read:  Evaluating Big Data Projects – Success and Failure Using an Integral Lens, Integral Leadership Review August – November 2013. You can also listen to the NPR interview that accompanies this paper including a dialogue between James Brenza, Maureen Metcalf, and the host Doug Dangler.

We also invite you to join the LinkedIn group Innovative Leadership for Analytics Programs on LinkedIn curated by James.

To become a more innovative leader, please consider our online leader development program. For additional tools, we recommend taking leadership assessments, using the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook and Innovative Leaders Guide to Transforming Organizations, and adding coaching to our online innovative leadership program. We also offer several workshops to help you build these skills.

If you are interested in receiving James’ seven part blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo credit: www.flickr.com IBM Curiosity shop

 

 

Take Action to Develop as a Leader – Eric’s Story

August 8, 2014

Taking actionI’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In this post we will take the next step in the innovative leadership development process: taking action. In this post we will discuss how to start in an effective way and show you how to mitigate any potential barriers.

Start Effectively

First of all, you must believe that you can accomplish your short-term milestones. If you’ve been closely following the previous posts and participating in the exercises, and you’re really serious about chasing your life goals, then you are more than capable of accomplishing these short-term milestones. You may seem a little intimidated and overwhelmed, but that’s what you want. If you’re not exiting your comfort zone then you’re not growing.

Secondly, this process will not only take you out of your comfort zone, but will require some consistent commitment. If you must, do not start out too extreme. Take it slow in the beginning, familiarize yourself with the routine and gradually push yourself to greater limits.

Overcoming Barriers

Most importantly, you’ll need to allow yourself some flexibility in your plan because you will likely face obstacles that may require you to temporarily modify your routine. Below is a worksheet to help you overcome your barriers. Feel free to refer to my answers to see how to answer each space. The goal I’m referring to is how I want to increase my productivity with work.

Barrier Action Planning Worksheet
Category Barrier Impact of Barrier How to Remove or Work Around Support I Need to Remove or Work Around This Barrier
In my thinking I over-analyze small details, which takes me on tangents about unrelated things. It distracts me, taking my focus away from the actual task, I end up thinking about something completely irrelevant Maintain perspective on the overall goal of certain tasks to better understand the functions behind the smaller details, requiring less thought later on. Personal support to hold me accountable each day.
In my behavior I try to multi-task way too much. This impedes my productivity. Focus on one task at a time, do it right the first time, practice “essentialism”. Personal support, casually reminding each other about essentialism.
In our beliefs We depend on third parties to do their part of a task too often. This slows us down because we wait for them to finish. Rely less on external sources’ work and consider doing their part by ourselves. Professional partnership support to find out what we can do without a third party.
In how we do things We multi-task as a group. It impedes productivity. reminding each other about focusing on the tasks at hand fully. Remember that I also need to focus and ask others to do the same.

Real World Application: Create a Barrier Log

Review your responses for the Barrier Action Planning Worksheet and create a spreadsheet document. Label the first column “Barrier”. Move one column to the right, and label the next five columns, from left to right, “Attempt #1”, “Attempt #2”, and so on. In the column labeled “Attempt #1”, write how you plan to overcome the corresponding barrier, perhaps using the response you put for the Barrier Action Planning Worksheet. If you fail on the first attempt, write a new or refined way to overcome that barrier, plus what you did wrong in the previous attempt, in the Attempt #2 section, and continue this process until you eventually overcome the barrier. On the attempt where you finally succeed, highlight that box in green. As new barriers rise, add them to the log; however, after you complete a barrier, it is critical that you keep it on the log and do not delete it.

This barrier log will be very useful because you will be able to track what did and did not work in order to overcome a barrier. You will likely come across barriers that are similar to previous ones, so knowing what worked (and what didn’t work) in advance, making the barrier easy to overcome. As time goes on, and you begin to see a long list of old barriers with green boxes, signifying success, your confidence in overcoming barriers will increase. It may be grueling to keep adding more attempts because you keep failing, but understand the that only true failure is failure to try.

Feel free to include barriers outside of the leadership development process, such as academic, social and even health barriers. Save this document in a cloud storage service for both safety and convenience. Update it on a regular basis. Also, if one of your mentors from the Build Your Team section is an “equal”, or someone in the same situation as you, have that person make a barrier log and share logs with each other online or during meetings.

In the next post, we will answer reflection questions to strengthen our understanding of how we’ll take action.

To become a more innovative leader, please consider our online leader development program. For additional tools, we recommend taking leadership assessments, using the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook and Innovative Leaders Guide to Transforming Organizations, and adding coaching to our online innovative leadership program. We also offer several workshops to help you build these skills.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.

Photo Credit: www.flickr.com Celestine Chua

Build Your Team & Communicate Reflection Questions Reflection Questions Part 2 – Eric’s Story

August 6, 2014

I’m Eric Philippou, and I’m writing this blog as part of my college internship at Metcalf & Associates. In the last post, I answered a series of reflection questions to strengthen my understanding of the development and communication of my support team. I have broken the reflection questions into two posts this one contains the second half of those questions.

Eric Reflection Questions Part 2 support team

This is the end of the Build Your Team & Communicate step. The next step is the second-to-last step in the innovative leadership development process, and perhaps the most exciting step: taking action!

To become a more innovative leader, please consider our online leader development program. For additional tools, we recommend taking leadership assessments, using the Innovative Leadership Fieldbook and Innovative Leaders Guide to Transforming Organizations, and adding coaching to our online innovative leadership program. We also offer several workshops to help you build these skills.

If you are interested in receiving Eric’s ongoing blog series or our other articles by email, please sign up in the box on the right labeled Get Email Updates From Us.